Warming Up
Warmups are done to increase heat throughout the body and to reduce the risk of straining and tearing muscles by increasing their suppleness.  A 2 to 3 minute jog creates a light sweat.  Complete that before stretching.  Then, move from general jogging to table tennis specific movements, such as shuffle footwork.  Stretching reduces muscle tension.  It is to reduce the risk of muscle and tendon injuries and increase flexibility and freedom of movement. Repeat each stretch 2 or 3 times.  Stretch gently and slowly.  Keep breathing.  Stretch to the point of tension, never pain.  Select the major muscle groups used in table tennis and stretch them through their full range of motion.  To increase or maintain flexibility and muscle suppleness, a 20 minute stretching session should be done 2 or 3 times/week.  This can be performed separately from your sporting activity.  

Off Table Drills 
Once a beginning student demonstrates the correct grip and is able to balance the ball on their racquet, a good next step is to be able to bounce the ball on the racquet.  Keys to this off the table drill are maintain a proper grip and being able to achieve multiple bounces in a row on both forehand and backhand.  Next is being able to bounce the ball alternately on the forehand and backhand.  Once a player is able to do this and walk at the same time, they are ready for more complex drills.

 Side to Side Footwork
Side to side footwork is the most used footwork, being fast and economical, enabling the player to be in the best position for every stroke.  The player prepares for the forehand with the shoulders rotated to the forehand side and the weight on the forehand leg.  At the conclusion of the stroke, the weight has been transferred to the opposite leg.  Contact is made from the backhand corner with the backhand stroke.  The movement to the backhand is a side step or shuffle.  

Backhand Block

The block is used primarily as a defensive technique against top spin and fast attacking strokes.  Utilizing the speed and spin of the opponent and generally contacted soon after the bounce keeping the ball low.  At the elite level, the block is called an active block, and is used more aggressively to return the ball faster or by cushioning the ball to reduce the speed with a stop-block or with sidespin.  The racquet should be kept bounce height during the stroke.  In prep, the leg position can be either parallel or with the left leg slightly forward to allow for easy movement to forehand attacking strokes.  The racquet is drawn back in a slightly closed position with the wrist bent slightly backwards.  During the swing and at contact, the forearm moves forward and slightly upwards, with the wrist straightening.  The racket is slightly closed according to the amount of spin, more spin, more closed.  In the follow through, the racquet and forearm continue to move forward and upward, finishing chin height. 

Forehand Block

The block is used primarily as a defensive technique against top spin and fast attacking strokes.  During the preparation, the leg position is similar to the forehand drive, though a little closer to the table to take the ball early.  The block has a short back swing with the racquet slightly closed and the elbow forming a 90 degree angle.  During the swing with the elbow as the pivot point the forearm moves forward and slightly upward.  The contact is taken early, with the racket slightly closed, according to the amount of spin on the ball, more spin more closed.  During the follow through, the racket and forearm continue to move forwards and upwards, finishing at chin height with shoulders parallel to the table.     
Forehand Push

The forehand push is primarily a defensive technique used for placement and control, though at intermediate and advanced levels, it is used aggressively, with contact taking early to setup an attacking stroke.  This is an important technique for beginners to master.  During the prep, the leg position is similar to the forehand drive, with the left leg forward for right handers, although defensive players can use a backhand leg position for this stroke.  Hips and shoulders are rotated slightly so the left side of the body is closest to the table.  The racket is brought back to the right hip area in a slightly open position.  During the swing and at contact, the racket moves forward to brush the bottom of the ball, contacting in front of the body and using the wrist to increase backspin.  During the follow through, the forearm is stretched forward above the playing surface with the racket open at the conclusion of the stroke.
 
Backhand Push

The forehand push is primarily a defensive technique used for placement and control, though at intermediate and advanced levels, it is used aggressively. The contact point should be taken just before the top for beginners and off the bounce for advanced players to setup the attacking strokes.  In the prep phase, the leg position is similar to the backhand drive.  The hips and shoulders are rotated slightly so the right side of the body is closest to the table.  The racket is brought back with elbow free from the body and racket in a slightly open position and just above elbow height. During the swing and at contact, the forearm moves forward and slightly downward with minimum use of the upper arm.  The racket becomes aggressively more open as the ball is contacted on the lower part.  During the follow through, the forearm is stretched forward above the playing surface with the racket open at the conclusion of the stroke.

Forehand Drive
The forehand drive is one of the key basic skills to master, being the basis for the smash and the offensive version of the block.  Just a little top spin is imparted to the ball.  In the prep phase, the leg position is with the left foot forward for right handers with the body angled to the right.  The hips rotate to the right as the arm is drawn back and the racket is slightly forward of vertical.  During the swing and at contact, the racket moves forward in line with the top of the bounce where contact is made slightly in front of the body.  The weight is transferred from the back leg to the front leg.  The forearm accelerates on contact to produce speed and power.  During follow through the upper body continues to rotate to the left with the weight transfer, with the arm follow through finishing in a 90 degree position at the elbow and 90 degrees between upper arm and body.

Backhand Drive
The backhand drive is another of the key basic skills to master, being an offensive version of the block and an aggressive placement technique in order to take the initiative on attack.  During the prep, the leg position can be parallel to the table or with the left leg slightly forward for right handers to allow for easy transfer to forehand strokes.    The racket is brought back to the left hip area with the wrist bent slightly backwards.  During the swing and at contact, the racket moves forward to contact the ball in front of the body with the wrist straightening and the forearm accelerating on contact to produce speed and power.    During the follow through, the racket moves forward and upward to a closed position in front of the upper body or head area.

Forehand Flip
The forehand flip, also known as a flick, is an attacking stroke against a short ball, using mostly wrist and forearm.  The player can alter the direction, speed and spin as well as flip or push the ball short or long with a quick change of the wrist.  The flip will use more of an upward brushing action against backspin, while the stroke is more horizontal against no spin, side spin or top spin.  A strong contact will also minimize the effect of the opponent’s spin.  A quick recovery is essential as the follow through over the table leaves the player in a vulnerable position.  During the prep, the forehand leg moves under the table with the body angled forward and the arm slightly bent.  During the swing, the racket moves forward horizontally with the racket neutral or slightly closed depending on the spin.  With the elbow as the pivot point, the stroke is performed with the forearm and wrist.  Contact is made at the top of the bounce in front of the body.  During follow through, the racket continues to move forward and upward while the player then recovers by moving the forehand leg back.

Backhand Flip
The backhand flip is an attacking stroke against a short ball, using mostly wrist and forearm.  The starting position is the same as the short push so the player can alter the direction, speed and spin as well as flip or push the ball short or long with a quick change of the wrist.  The flip will use more of an upward brushing action against backspin, while the stroke is more horizontal against no spin, side spin or top spin.  A strong contact will also minimize the effect of the opponent’s spin.  For a ball wide on the backhand, it is preferable to step forward with the left foot, which has the player in position for a follow-up forehand.  In the middle to backhand area, the right foot will move under the table. .  A quick recovery is essential as the follow through over the table leaves the player in a vulnerable position. During the prep, the forehand leg moves under the table with the body angled forward and the arm slightly bent.  During the swing, the wrist is drawn back and the racket is neutral and below the ball for backspin and more open and behind the ball for no spin, side spin and top spin.  The ball is contacted at the top of the bounce.  During the follow through, the racket continues to move forward and upward, finishing with the arm fully extended and the racket in a closed position.
 
Backspin Serve

The serve is the only time the player has 100% control of the situation.  Variation of speed, spin and placement with a similar action is an area that requires much attention.  Once the major principals of serving are understood, the serve is the only aspect of table tennis that can be developed to a significant extent away from competition opportunities.  The backspin serve is one of the most fundamental serves that every player should know.

Forehand Loop
The forehand loop gets its name from the loop-like trajectory created by topspin and is used increasingly, as the player develops, and involves top spinning the opponent’s topspin ball.  Forehand loops can be played away from the table as the ball is dropping or close to the table off the bounce on the half volley as well as on top of the bounce.  During the prep, from a position with the left foot forward for right handers, the hips, waist and shoulders all rotate to the right bringing the weight on to the right leg.  The arm is brought back and lowered under ball height thou higher and more closed than for topspin against backspin defense.  Contact is between the shoulders at waist height with the racket closed.  Contact on the ball is at 2 o’clock.  During follow through, the weight transfer to the left leg is completed as the body rotates to the left.  The racket finishes high with the forearm in a 90 degree position at the elbow and 90 degree between upper arm and body.  
 
Forehand Loop against Underspin

Topspin is generally recognized as the most used and most important of all table tennis techniques.  The nature of topspin means the ball can be hit with great spin or speed and the rotation of the ball will draw it downwards towards the table.  Initially players are taught to contact the ball as the ball is descending after the top of the bounce.  At elite levels, players are taught to contact the ball at various points to increase variation.  During prep, from a position with left foot forward for right handers, the hips, waist and shoulders rotate to the right, bringing the weight onto the right leg, as the arm is brought back and lowered under ball height.  The shoulder points to the ball on back swing.  To play a ball with more backspin, a lower back swing and more open blade is required.  During the swing, the racket moves in an upward path as the legs straighten and the hips, waist and shoulders unwind to the left.  At contact the forearm accelerates as contact is made in a brushing action at the top of the bounce or soon after.  During the follow through, the weight transfer to the left leg is completed with the arm follow through finishing in a 90 degree position at the elbow and 90 degree between upper arm and body.  
    
Backhand Loop against Underspin

The backhand loop against underspin utilizes mainly forearm and wrist together with the hip and waist movement due to the neutral stance minimal weight transfer occurs.  The backhand topspin is often less powerful than the forehand topspin.  However, notable exceptions exist, particularly where a backhand group is used due to the neutral stance.  The player should experiment with finding the correct distance in front of the body for contact.  During prep, the leg position for a backhand topspin can vary from a neutral stance with feet parallel to the table to either leg slightly forward.  Forehand attackers often prefer to be in a slightly forehand stance.  The back swing is higher than the knees and a bit to the left.  The elbow becomes like a hinge and does not move much.  For a right-handed player the shoulders move to the left with the right shoulder lowered and forward, the wrist bent backward and the racket closed during the swing and at contact.  The racket moves forward and upward as the knees straighten and the hips, waist and shoulders rotate contacting the ball in front of the body.  The wrist accelerates on contact.  During follow through the arm is fully stretched forward and racket closed head high at the conclusion of the stroke.

The Smash
The smash is a power stroke used to finish the rally, usually from a high ball.  Ideally the smash is performed at shoulder height at the top of the bounce.  The smash can also be taken early to give the opponent less time though this is a higher risk stroke.  Another option for higher balls is to jump and make contact in the air to enable shoulder-high contact or to allow the ball to descend to should height.  During the prep, the racket is waist high in prep for a forehand stroke.  During the swing when the height of the ball is known, the racket is moved directly behind and slightly above the ball making a line between racket, ball and the opponent’s side of the table.  At contact the weight is moves forward as contact is made slightly in front of the body.  During the follow through, the body weight shifts completely to the left leg for right-handed players with the stroke finishing head height.

Forehand Lob
The lob is a defensive technique played well back from the table in response to a smash or first topspin, using topspin action to hit the ball high in the air.  The aim is to land the ball deep on the table with maximum topspin so the ball bounce moves the opponent well back from the table.  The lob is often used when a player is out of position to give them time to position themselves to play a stronger stroke on the next ball.  During prep, the player is in forehand topspin stance and racket at knee height.  During the swing and at contact, a relatively vertical brushing topspin action is used with contact depending on the height of the smash.  Ideally contact will be at waist height.  The racket follows through in an upward direction finishing head height.

Backhand Lob
The lob is a defensive technique played well back from the table in response to a smash or first topspin, using topspin action to hit the ball high in the air.  The aim is to land the ball deep on the table with maximum topspin so the ball bounce moves the opponent well back from the table.  The lob is often used when a player is out of position to give them time to position themselves to play a stronger stroke on the next ball.  During prep, the player is in a neutral stance with the right shoulder forward and downward for a right handed player.  The starting position is below the ball and as for backhand topspin anywhere from between the legs to the outside of the leg.  During the swing and at contact, a relatively vertical brushing topspin action is used with contact depending on the height of the smash.  The racket follows through in an upward direction finishing head height.